With $665 I’d rather buy…

13 08 2009

2008-’09 Upper Deck Exquisite Basketball is live.

For $665 (or higher) you are promised five cards (4 hits, 1 base).

Here are some things you could buy instead of a pack of Exquisite Basketball.

1983 Cadillac SevilleA little work and you could be pimpin’ in style

Samsung 32″ HDTVOriginal Sega Dreamcast video game console not included

Sensuous MassageAs long as you know it’s Ronald McDonald’s twin sister doing it

Advertisements

Actions

Information

81 responses

13 08 2009
darkship

I watched three boxes opened last nite on youtube and he got one hit, a printing plate and three base in two of the three boxes! I normally like UD but that is just plain wrong!!!!

13 08 2009
chemgod

Wow 1300 bucks for 2 printing plates and 2 auto patch cards that are going to be worthless in 3 years. Woo Hoo where do I sign up?

13 08 2009
Gellman

Regardless of the cards these guys pulled, check out some of the singles on eBay, they look awesome, especially some of the limited logo cards and some of the inscription cards.

13 08 2009
R-

Gellman, how much does Upper Deck pay you to support all their releases and to write for their adverblog?

These overpriced products have one good box in every ten cases. I’m ready to see what Panini has to offer.

13 08 2009
SteveTX

Products like this is what’s killing the hobby.

How can Upper Deck justify that kind of price for this kind of product and why are people even buying it? It not only makes UD look bad, but collectors look like the ultimate suckers.

13 08 2009
darkship

I have to agree that the cards look great! The auto patches are amazing!!

13 08 2009
Hoiles

I bet you could also buy some sweet tickets to an NBA game and an authentic jersey, and have it auto’ed by Lebron or Kobe for less than $665.

13 08 2009
Iamjoecollector

The cards are nice, but singles are whre it’s at. Exquisite basketball has always done well, whether it be box price or singles becaue of the lebron/Jordan gravy train. I think that is coming to an end shortly as the market is being over run with Jordan autos /23. If you aren’t a set builder, nothing but high end boxes will do. How man single color jersey cards /1000’s can one collect?

For Ryan’s sake I hope panini comes strong with on card autos

13 08 2009
Iamjoecollector

Hoiles

No you can’t.

13 08 2009
Code Blue

I think these products exist solely for my enjoyment in watching people waste money.

Works every release.

13 08 2009
mfw13

How about a Near Mint 1955 Willie Mays and a 1955 Near Mint Hank Aaron….

OR

a Near Mint 1956 Sandy Koufax AND a Near Mint 1956 Roberto Clemente

OR

a Near Mint 1954 Yogi Berra and a Near Mint 1954 Jackie Robinson

OR

a Near Mint 1961 Fleer Oscar Robertson RC AND a Near Mint 1961 Fleer Elgin Baylor RC

OR

a Near Mint 1961 Fleer Bill Russell AND a Near Mint 1961 Fleer Bob Cousy

OR

a Near Mint 1955 Topps All-American Knute Rockne AND a Near Mint 1955 Topps All-American Otto Graham AND a Near Mint 1955 Topps All-American Sammy Baugh

OR

a Near Mint 1958 Topps Jim Brown RC AND a 1958 Near Mint Bart Starr

As SteveTX said so eloquently, anybody who spends money on products like this that will be pretty worthless in a few years is the ultimate sucker….

13 08 2009
Paul

It should be call UD Risk because that’s what you take opening up packs at that price. With Panini taking over basketball, this is probably the last Exquisite release for a while. I can’t see UD doing this type of set for college stuff and/or with airbrushed logos.

13 08 2009
Hoiles

iamjoecollector, you are probably right because of the exorbitant prices that Lebron or Kobe apparently charge for autos (thanks to their agreement with UD). But I still maintain you could at least get a star player’s auto on a jersey for less (like a Nash or Ray Allen-type).

Anyways, if you’re into gambling, you’d probably have a better chance of buying $665 worth of lottery tickets and winning enough money to buy an auto Kobe or Lebron jersey than actually getting an auto from those two in the box.

13 08 2009
jswaykos

I would never spend that much on cards, but that’s just me. I really couldn’t care less what other people buy, though. I’ll just watch their breaks on youtube and experience the disappointment vicariously!

13 08 2009
Charlie

Breaking high-end boxes is always a gamble. Just like low or mid-end boxes. It’s all relative to the price paid. How many people have busted a $70 box of Topps series 1 and gotten $15 worth of cards? That’s a 21% return on investment.

That being said, the video posted here is obviously a packaging mistake, and I guarantee you that Chris will get UD to attone for the oversight. Those boxes are supposed to contain 4 hits and 1 base, and obviously someone screwed up here. Not the 1st time and not the last time this will happen with EVERY company.

People get shorted hits/damaged cards in Topps and Donruss boxes too.

13 08 2009
Hoiles

That’s the thing… low or maybe mid-end boxes are about collecting, not about return on investment. I really don’t care if I flushed $60 down the toilet on a low-end box…. $600 is another story.

13 08 2009
Mario A.

Who the heck is trying to get a return on investment with Topps Series 1?

Now go watch the hundreds of Exquisite videos on YouTube and listen to collectors throwing a fit for not pulling that $1,000 Jordan or Lebron.

13 08 2009
mfw13

Exactly. Collectors don’t care about how much the cards they get are worth because they never plan on selling them.

Investors/speculators care only about how much the cards they get are worth because are they care about is flipping them for a profit.

Now there may be a few player collectors out there like Gellman who actually collect the high-end stuff, but I’m guessing the 90% of the people who buy the high end products are pure speculators who will abandon the hobby in droves once they realize how much money they are losing chasing high-value “hits”.

13 08 2009
beaverman3001

I think you guys grossly overestimate and stereotype people who buy expensive products. Guess what, not everyone is poor, or has responsibilities, or kids/families etc. People have money believe it or not, and they choose to collect expensive cards. If I have money to spend on boxes, would I rather get 4 boxes of premier, or 1 exquisite. Exquisite would be the easy choice, you get less, but your chances of a higher quality hit are better. And when you do hit big, the card from exquisite essentially takes a dump on the premier version.

Not everyone enjoys the same things as the people posting here. We don’t want your garbage 1950s topps base cards. Are they valueable? Sure absolutely they are, doesn’t mean I give a damn about them or want to own them. I never saw Sandy Koufax play 1 single game, because I wasn’t born then, so why the hell do I want his cards? Some of us like to collect people we actually watch/watched, and to get nice things. I don’t understand why this is so hard to comprehend and I think it is just negative sentiment from people who like to tell others what way of collecting is right or wrong, which is one of the dumbest things I can think of.

13 08 2009
petrosian

man 655 would give me a nice push on completing the 1998 donruss crusades.

13 08 2009
Bryan

There’s just no sense in paying that much money for a box. 9 times out of 10 you won’t come close to breaking even. If you have that much to spend on top end cards, find what you want on ebay and buy it.

13 08 2009
beaverman3001

Bryan that philosophy only can go so far. Who provides the singles if we are all on ebay buying them? Someone has to open the boxes. People who have that much to spend typically buy singles they want anyway.

13 08 2009
Gellman

Now go watch the hundreds of Exquisite videos on YouTube and listen to collectors throwing a fit for not pulling that $1,000 Jordan or Lebron.

Do you expect them to be happy when they pull nothing? Cmon, human emotion drives reactions, not the price of the box. People do it when they pull junk out of a box of Topps. Charlie is right.

Stop damning a product because people get fired up when they dont pull anything.

13 08 2009
Gellman

Products like this is what’s killing the hobby.

Explain. Especially considering how many people outside of baseball buy ONLY this stuff. Basketball especially.

Does this mean you would say that adding products to appease a huge portion of collectors would be something that is “killing the hobby?” Cmon, that is ludicrious. The hobby centers around people collecting, not manufacturers making high end products. As it has been said before, the hobby will always be here, even if the industry isnt. Considering that the industry thrives on high end stuff, it wouldnt be killing the industry either.

All that high end products do are anger a few baseball collectors who are angry that the hobby they grew up with has changed. Collectors from every other sport live on it and embrace it.

Does that mean that low-end is wrong? No, even though people want you to believe that high end is. The only thing that is wrong is when people think that anything like cost of boxes or number of products is killing things.

Its not.

13 08 2009
SteveTX

Not trying to start an argument with this, but I think this box break really leads to a much bigger problem: Accountability.

I don’t think I’m alone in saying that the big two (or three) card companies take collectors for granted. They think “Oh, we’ll just throw a couple of certified autos in this box, give people the chance to win a super rare one of one autograph, and people will buy it no matter how much we charge”.

Remember when finding an insert card really mattered or when finding a certified autograph was nearly impossible? I kinda miss those days–along with being able to buy a 36 count box of cards for $20-30!

I just can’t get my head around the fact that sports have never more popular than they are right now (think about how many sports channels you get on cable now compared to 10 or even 5 years ago) and yet sports card collectors are leaving the hobby in droves.

Are the big three card companies really so dense that they can’t figure out why? How much more do they think the few collectors they have left will keep putting up with until everyone’s gone?

13 08 2009
Gellman

I just can’t get my head around the fact that sports have never more popular than they are right now (think about how many sports channels you get on cable now compared to 10 or even 5 years ago) and yet sports card collectors are leaving the hobby in droves.

Are you sure this is happening? I think the non-baseball part of the hobby has grown pretty considerably over the last few years. I think the biggest thing that causes people to leave is the economy. This is a hobby built completely on disposable income, and when there is none, people leave. It has nothing to do with anything else.

Remember when finding an insert card really mattered or when finding a certified autograph was nearly impossible? I kinda miss those days–along with being able to buy a 36 count box of cards for $20-30!

Although you may miss the absence of an autographed or game used component to many products, there are thousands of people who came to or have stuck around in this hobby BECAUSE of those elements – myself included. If you alienate those people with less chances to get the things they love, then the industry will change drastically for the worse.

I have said and will say again, variety of products and cost of products are not the reason things seem bad. People are looking for a reason things have changed, but its more of just the times we live in.

13 08 2009
R-

I like how someone posted using my moniker at the top.

13 08 2009
SteveTX

Well Gellman, considering you’re a contributor to Upper Deck’s blogs, I guess this is about as close as I can get to venting my frustration at “the industry”.

Gellman wrote:
“Are you sure this is happening? I think the non-baseball part of the hobby has grown pretty considerably over the last few years.”

You’re right, I can’t say for 100% certainty that fewer people are collecting today than they were in 1994, but I have a pretty good idea when:

-the only people buying boxes of cards at Target/Walmart are my age (mid to late 20s) or older.

-sports card shows don’t occur anymore and almost every sports card shop in my city (Austin, TX) has long since closed.

-I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid buying sports cards or talking about them.

Gellman wrote:
“Although you may miss the absence of an autographed or game used component to many products, there are thousands of people who came to or have stuck around in this hobby BECAUSE of those elements – myself included.”

Again, I don’t have hard facts to back up me up on this, but what I can say is that since certified autographs and game-used jersey swatches have gone from being extremely rare to “one per box”, the prices for cards has gone up substantially.

$600 for 5 cards is a perfect example. How could making the hobby MORE expensive result in MORE people wanting to start collecting cards? It’s an absurd theory.

13 08 2009
Ricky

[i]the only people buying boxes of cards at Target/Walmart are my age (mid to late 20s) or older.[/i]

And this is why collecting will never be like it used to.. Cards used to cost 50 cents when I collected, and at the supermarket or gas station I’d always ask my Mother to buy me a pack, and she always would.. That definitely would NOT have been the case if packs cost $4 or something.. It was the cheap price that enabled all kids to get in on the hobby.. You always hear the figures how collecting hit it’s peak in the early 90’s, where the revenue was like 5x more – and that was when packs were 5x cheaper, at LEAST! So can the card companies not realize this? Inserts, autos, and relics are cool – but there’s WAYYYYYYY too many of them, and the extra money they have to pay players for them is making the product way too expensive.. They obviously can’t realize this tho apparently, and continue to be gluttonous slobs producing in extreme excess.. There’s actually a correlation about the “guaranteed hits per box and 43542 inserts and parallels” to how American people are nowadays in general – overweight and lazy, wanting everything with as little effort as possible..

13 08 2009
beaverman3001

The point of what he said, economic downturns are bad for industries based on disposable income. Past few years have been a economical down turn…so the hobby has gone down in popularity. Not exactly a hard trend to understand. It isn’t as if UD made Exquisite and said “this is the only product we are producing, spend 600$+ or you can’t buy cards”. They make different price points for different audiences, and somehow most of you are too stupid to understand this and keep blabbering about regular base cards being more popular, I don’t get it.

13 08 2009
Gellman

Well Gellman, considering you’re a contributor to Upper Deck’s blogs, I guess this is about as close as I can get to venting my frustration at “the industry”.

Sorry, I am not affiliated professionally with UD in any decision making fashion. Right now you are just venting at me, the blogger.

the only people buying boxes of cards at Target/Walmart are my age (mid to late 20s) or older.

And? Why does this make 1 product on the release calendar, or even 5 a problem? Exquisite nor any high end are at those outlets.

sports card shows don’t occur anymore and almost every sports card shop in my city (Austin, TX) has long since closed.

More related to the lack of money available to spend, advent of a better selling system with millions of customers (ebay), and having to pay for a storefront and rent vs not.

I can’t remember the last time I saw a kid buying sports cards or talking about them.

Its more because kids arent paying attention to pro sports as much as they used to. I have a lot of nieces and nephews, and none of them pay attention to sports. They sure pay attention to their XBOX though. There never was a multibillion dollar gaming industry before, now there is. Cable and the internet is also more available now than ever. This is why kids dont like cards anymore. Although, there sure were a lot of kids at the store signing I went to a few months ago. Guess what? They were all buying high end stuff.

Again, I don’t have hard facts to back up me up on this, but what I can say is that since certified autographs and game-used jersey swatches have gone from being extremely rare to “one per box”, the prices for cards has gone up substantially.

$600 for 5 cards is a perfect example. How could making the hobby MORE expensive result in MORE people wanting to start collecting cards? It’s an absurd theory.

Exquisite and high end make up less than 10% of the baseball products and less than 25% of the football ones. That means there is still a shit load of other products to choose from. Its not like YOU HAVE TO BUY HIGH END. All you have buy is what you like, and its always cost around the same amount. It may have cost 30 bucks a box before, but if you adjust for inflation, and add a few bucks, a box of topps still costs around the same. When was the last time 10 bucks made a difference to a kid who is more interested in 60 dollar video games and his cell phone? Just because there are now 600 dollar boxes of cards, doesnt mean you have to buy them. Topps is still topps, and now, thanks to the internet, its available to everyone, everywhere.

13 08 2009
Bryan Fitzgerald
13 08 2009
Mario A.

Great link, Bryan!

13 08 2009
Ricky

–They make different price points for different audiences, and somehow most of you are too stupid to understand this —

I fully understand that.. What’s the cheapest price point tho? At least $3 a pack I’m guessing.. And that still excludes kids for the most part – who baseball cards were originally meant for.. Based on inflation a pack of cards should still be around a dollar, but they’re not.. They’re not targeted for kids anymore – they’re targeted towards people with jobs looking for valuable hits.. And the hobby has catered to this, creating greed with “guaranteed hits per box”.. Even if a kid could afford the lowest price point cards, he’d be tantalized by all this higher end cards that he couldn’t afford.. The price of cards in general has obviously driven away the kids, and it has nothing to do with the economy..

13 08 2009
Ricky

–Its more because kids arent paying attention to pro sports as much as they used to. I have a lot of nieces and nephews, and none of them pay attention to sports.–

You cannot come to that generalization based on your nieces and nephews.. I have an 11 year old brother and him and his friends have been THOROUGHLY into sports for years.. He actually found all my old baseball cards when he was about 6, and he’d spend hours going thru them all.. But for all the reasons I pointed out in my previous post, he never got into the hobby.. I never really thought about it til now, and it’s bullshit..

13 08 2009
beaverman3001

Someone buys a product they shouldn’t be spending the money on then cries when they strike out, nothing new. This isn’t for everyone.

13 08 2009
DMS6391

I’ll take that Hickson Au/GU off his hands if he doesn’t want it!

But seriously…wow thats a rip off. Thats just plain awful

13 08 2009
mfw13

Gellman:

With regards to the kids and sports issue I can only tell you the following. I’m an elementary school teacher who awards kids “tokens” throughout the school year for good behavior and academic achievement that can be redeemed for prizes at the end of each quarter. Among these prizes are packs of cards I have put together from the cheap 80’s/90’s wax I like to rip which contain about 15-20 cards each from various sports and years and feature a hometown player (Mariner, Seahawk, or Sonic, since I live in Seattle) on the front. They have consistently been the most popular prize among boys to the extent that I go through probably 80-100 packs a year even though I have fewer than 15 boys in my class.

However what Ricky said (and we discussed previously on the Upper Deck thread) is absolutely true….the fact that there are ZERO reasonably priced products out there (i.e. 10+ cards per pack for less than a dollar) is keeping kids out of the hobby.

13 08 2009
SteveTX

Gellman wrote:
“Sorry, I am not affiliated professionally with UD in any decision making fashion. Right now you are just venting at me, the blogger.”

Well, you may not get a check from Upper Deck every two weeks (or maybe you do for all I know), but you do/did contribute to their blog.

Here’s the link in case you forgot:
http://upperdeckblog.com/2009/08/new-collector-corner-a-guide/

Let me ask you this: If this was a Topps release, would you still feel the same way?

Your personal blog is a bunch of pro-Upper Deck propoganda, and yet you call yourself “Sports Cards Uncensored”. The irony is delicious.

But I guess you’re right. Let’s all just keep drinking the Kool-Aid and remind ourselves that the card industry has never been better.

13 08 2009
Mike

“Someone buys a product they shouldn’t be spending the money on then cries when they strike out, nothing new. This isn’t for everyone.”

Beaverman, you are correct sir. I used to buy mostly high end, and I had a few nice hits but alot of misses. And yeah, you sure do feel like you got kicked in the junk when it happens. But you do have a choice, you can either buy it or not. I choose to no longer buy any boxes and hunt out the singles I want. That’s just me. Alot of people out there have a ton of cash and are willing to drop a huge amount on this kind of roll of the dice. High-end buying is not for everyone. just like prospecting is not for everyone, just like set building isn’t for everyone.

As far as that link goes, UD should email that person back and profusely apologize that they did not receive the 1/1 NBA logo, DNA, printing plate, quad relic, super patch double auto of lebron and jordan. UD did not put a gun to their head to buy the box nor did they promise the hit of year in it. You rolled the dice, got snake eyes, and now you have a little thing called buyers remorse.

13 08 2009
Gellman

Your personal blog is a bunch of pro-Upper Deck propoganda, and yet you call yourself “Sports Cards Uncensored”. The irony is delicious.

Its not propaganda when its my personal opinion. My personal opinion is that UD makes the best football products, which they do. People seem to think that because my opinion is pro-ud that it cant be independent of influence from the company. Go, look, compare, and think, which football products are best? Its UD by a mile. That’s it, my opinion.

Let me ask you this: If this was a Topps release, would you still feel the same way?

This isnt a discussion of Topps vs UD, its high end is good vs high end is bad. Really, I get that you dont like high end, but you dont like it for reasons that dont really make sense. You dont seem to see that I support both high end and low end because it means there is something for everyone.

However what Ricky said (and we discussed previously on the Upper Deck thread) is absolutely true….the fact that there are ZERO reasonably priced products out there (i.e. 10+ cards per pack for less than a dollar) is keeping kids out of the hobby.

So, you want 10 plus cards for less than a dollar? Are you serious? You cant even get a diet coke for less than a dollar. Because cost of the materials, licensing, and production has increased (just like with every industry), the cost of the end product has increased. That is like asking for a mercedes for the price of a honda.

Personally, I dont get why you are using “THINK OF THE CHILDREN!” as your rallying cry. Just like with every other collectible industry that boomed in the 90s, kids are gone. You are trying to diagnose a current problem with a paradigm of thinking from 1985. Things in the world have changed, but your reference range has not. Its now 2009, and kids dont care any more. Its not because of box price, its because of other options that they have for entertainment.

13 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

Good point Steve.

Mojo

13 08 2009
night owl

OK, way, way, way, WAY back on this thread the following was said:

“I never saw Sandy Koufax play 1 single game because I wasn’t born then, so why the hell do I want his cards?”

I don’t know, maybe to learn about the guy? To get a sense of the tradition of the game and gain a little more perspective on today’s game and today’s ballplayers?

I never saw Sandy play a single game either (I was born then — I was a 1 year old when he played his last game), but give me every card of his you can. I’ll take cards of Frankie Frisch, Nap Lajoie, Lou Gehrig, Ducky Medwick, Shoeless Joe, etc., who all played eons ago. Just because I didn’t see them, doesn’t mean they have any less meaning. This is strictly my personal feeling but I almost feel it’s my responsibility to get to know these guys as a fan of the game.

Now, that doesn’t mean I think all collectors should collect vintage. They can collect whatever they want. They have $665 for five cards and can live with that, more power to them. And more vintage for me. But it bothers me when people disregard older players just because THEY didn’t see them.

14 08 2009
ToddUncommon

The kind of guys that drop almost $700 (per box…of five cards…) on Upper Deck Ass-quisite also seem the be the kind that stick their neck out and constantly go all in when the first community card comes out, trying to intimidate everyone into playing shy. They pump fists at every kitten ante win, and forget the majority of the times they get cleaned out by someone more patient with pocket queens.

Guess what? Upper Deck has the pocket queens.

Clearly UD’s idea of a “hit” is much, much, different that the one these guys have while opening boxes of UD Vainglorious like sheeple.

Remind me why Upper Deck is supposed to be SOOO much better at the “high end” than Topps (or Panini). Boxes like this?

I do genuinely hope that UD picks up its game and stops trying to convince us that yet another Kobe Bryant or Vince Carter 1/ass printing plate thrown into the hobby is a fat hit.

14 08 2009
beaverman3001

I need a 1950s card to learn about a guy? Are you serious, did you really just say that lol? Jesus Christ people we are in the age of the internet. I’m not saying vintage is bad (I own a few myself for personal reasons). Read wikipedia or baseball reference for a few weeks, and you can have a “sense of the game”.

14 08 2009
Charlie

This is all getting really fucking old and tired.

Adam, honestly, why do you still bother? Most of the people who frequent this blog now are bitchy set collectors who hate high end. You’re never going to change their minds.

All you are going to get is: “Packs should be 12 cents and have 47 cards in them”, and “My mom used to buy me packs at Pick n Save, and they were the best EVAR!!”.

Although this is my favorite post from this entire thread:

“Now go watch the hundreds of Exquisite videos on YouTube and listen to collectors throwing a fit for not pulling that $1,000 Jordan or Lebron”

100’s of videos. Yet these products are killing the hobby, and people don’t want these kinds of $600 products. Hmmm?

I think the biggest thing that pisses me off is that this is Mario’s own doing. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it 100 times. LOOK AT MARIO’S FUCKING COLLECTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
High-end galore. Sticker autos out the yinyang. His sig on FCB is 2 UD Black 1/1’s!! His “white whale” comes from a mid/high-end product, and has a giant silver sticker on it!!

High-end products, player collectors, prospectors, speculators, flippers, and whatever-the-fuck-other names you want to come up with for us drive this hobby. If they didn’t, none of that shit would exist.

Fucking deal with it and quit crying.

We don’t constantly bash you for being set collectors or waxing nostalgic over junk from the late 80’s, do we?

Fuck it! I’m tired of this crybaby bullshit.

14 08 2009
mfw13

Gellman….you said:

“So, you want 10 plus cards for less than a dollar? Are you serious?”

My answer is that yes….I’m dead serious. Adjusted for inflation, a plain cardboard baseball card with no technological embellishments (such as Goudey, Heritage, OPC, etc.) should cost about a nickel a card. This incorporates approximately 70% cumulative inflation from twenty years ago (i.e. 1989), when Topps sold at 45 cents for 15 cards (i.e. three cents per card), to the present. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever except corporate greed and stupidity that base cards retail at 20+ cents per card.

As to why I harp on the need to accomodate and attract kids to the hobby, it’s because they are the hobby’s future. Virtually every COLLECTOR begins collecting cards as a kid, and it’s the lifelong collectors who will keep the hobby afloat over the long term, not the high-end prospectors and flippers who care only about pulling high-value cards and who will abandon the hobby as soon as the thrill of gambling on high end wax wears off and/or the start to realize how much money they are losing.

14 08 2009
Jumper48

If you have the money, picking up product like Exquisite is fine but you have to take in to consideration that the product may not give you a return on your investment. Personally if a product appeals to me and is higher end I tend to stick with buying the singles. This way I get what I want for my money.

Here is that Kobe Black Printing Plate he pulled. it is at $132 with 4 1/2 days left:

http://cgi.ebay.com/2008-09-Exquisite-Kobe-Bryant-Black-Printing-Plate-1-1_W0QQitemZ270441711890QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_SM_Sports_Cards?hash=item3ef7950912&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

14 08 2009
Mario A.

Charlie,

Again, what does my collection of Andrew Miller UD Black, Exquisite, Sweet Spot, etc. have to do with this topic? When did I start pretending to be a set collector and/or vintage fan?

I was merely pointing out that no matter what anyone says on the subject, 99% of box breaks from this stuff will cause you to lose money and there are a lot better things to do than spend $600+ on five cards.

For the record, I buy ANYTHING on my player. I have as many low-end cards as I do those high-end releases some poor sap got suckered into buying just so he can pull a Mike Rabelo 1/1 autograph.

Gellman and others, keep buying this shit. I need more $6 dollar autographs for my collection. And no, that’s not just Miller. So many of those high-end singles sell for next to nothing, even some beautiful Hanley Ramirez cards.

Talk about getting your money’s worth.

14 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

Charlie

Your so out of line it’s ridiculous.

“I think the biggest thing that pisses me off is that this is Mario’s own doing”

Have a little respect, and take a moment to realize what garbage is coming out of your mouth Bro.

Listen

We all need to get along, and not bash each other. Every collector is different just like every collection is.

However, Upper Deck is wrong. DEAD WRONG.

Reason #1
They claim this product is hand packed by professionals. In that case mistakes like the video above should never happen. It makes the company look bad, and the person who just dropped 650.00 fell even worse.

Reason #2
Limit you checklist to superstars only!!! There is no reason to charge an insane amount of money for a high end product that is full of average players you can obtain in a low end one. Thats just not right. DO YOUR RESEARCH UPPER DECK!!

Last but not least

Its unfortunate that our hobby has turned into gambling, but that exactly what high end products like Exquisite are. If you think you can walk into Vegas, and win big every time you are a fool. If you think you can drop 650.00 on a box of cards and walk away with Lebrons autographed jersey every time you are even a bigger one.

Mojo

14 08 2009
Charlie

1. Set collectors bash high-end player collectors on here constantly.
2. I NEVER said you should pull Lebrons and Jordans every time.
3. ANY box of cards you open, 99% of the time is not going to see a decent ROI.
4. I SAID it was gambling, and I am glad ppl open these boxes, otherwise my player collection would not exist and neither would Gellman’s.

14 08 2009
Gellman

As to why I harp on the need to accomodate and attract kids to the hobby, it’s because they are the hobby’s future. Virtually every COLLECTOR begins collecting cards as a kid, and it’s the lifelong collectors who will keep the hobby afloat over the long term, not the high-end prospectors and flippers who care only about pulling high-value cards and who will abandon the hobby as soon as the thrill of gambling on high end wax wears off and/or the start to realize how much money they are losing.

Wrong, at least now days. In today’s market most collectors come into this as an adult (18+), same with comics, same with other collectible industries. Its because adults have cars, the internet, and money. Therefore they have more access to the cards themselves. Did you think kids are the reason the boom in the 90s happened? No, adults were the reason.

Secondly, you say the effect of gambling wears off, yet I see the same people on the net, product after product “gambling” away. See, to them its just income disposal in a fun way, not a risk. They have the money. Its the same in the shops. I just watched a guy bust 3 cases of Ultimate basketball. He had never done it before, but it was so much fun for him that he didnt care he got crap. These products arent targeted to people that have apartments, they are targeted to the whales. Kids have other stuff, but thanks to their parents, they like this stuff a lot. The future, in terms of kids in the hobby, are the kids of collectors today. Otherwise, kids arent just going to come without a push by an outside force like they used to. Its a different world, and the industries have realized that adults are the cash cows. Thats why products like Exquisite exist. I mean look, there sure are a lot of people who love it – check eBay.

14 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

Why?

Whats up with all this bashing? Pretty stupid isnt it? I think we are all grown up here, or at least I hope we are. I understand we all have a passion for our hobby, but once you push that wall down it becomes hatred. That goes for everyone that insists on degrading another persons views, or collection just because it is different then theirs.

Mojo

14 08 2009
Hoiles

Don’t know if video games are the reason for the downfall of the card industry… there was Segs and NES in the 80’s-90’s and kids had money to get both.

Which brings up an interesting point though, now a box of cards costs as much (probably) more than a video game. Why buy a box of pictures when you can get an interactive game with 3D graphics and 10 different modes for less? I’d also say a game like MLB The Show has higher production costs, and the same licensing than a Sega game from the early 90’s but isn’t that much more expensive, yet the cost of cards has tripled or quadrupled. Can’t ever see “low-end” being that popular again if the price is so high.

14 08 2009
Gellman

They claim this product is hand packed by professionals. In that case mistakes like the video above should never happen. It makes the company look bad, and the person who just dropped 650.00 fell even worse.

Hand packed from a seeding chart by people who have a quota of boxes to fill in a VERY short time. Its like this for every hand packed product, incuding topps and panini.

Things are going to get screwed up, just like with every product. What the “hand packed for value” really means is that the seeding chart favors more than one case hit per case or something like that. It doesnt mean that every box is going to be a winner.

Don’t know if video games are the reason for the downfall of the card industry… there was Segs and NES in the 80’s-90’s and kids had money to get both.

Well, in the 80s and 90s, Video games were not the juggernaut they are now, and were more available to people who had the money to spend. Now, thanks to a lot of innovations, it has become a huge multibillion dollar industry. Is it the sole reason? No, is it a huge reason? Yes.

The main thing I was trying to say is that there are a lot more cheap sources of entertainment for kids now, especially now that the average american has at least 1 computer and 2 televisions per household. Kids are growing up differently, and unless they have collectors for parents, they arent even close to as lucky to stumble on the hobby.

14 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

“Things are going to get screwed up just like any other product”

Unfortunately I have been on the other end of that rainbow far to many times with Upper Deck. I can show you the endless amount of crap that they have sent me to try to compensate. Its far worse then the initial mistake that was made in the first place trust me. Its also very time consuming, and frustrating for the consumer.

Its not like they are packing 50 cards by hand. What is it 4 or 5? I have seen the boxes, and yes they are pretty big for such a small volume of cards.

This is not any other product it is a very expensive product, extra time, and detail should be put into it. Screw ups of that magnitude are unacceptable.

No excuses when you are paying over 100.00 a card.

Mojo

14 08 2009
Dave

I have to say that the comments here have been very entertaining to read. I see both sides of the argument – I happen to collect both high end and low end cards. The thing that I don’t understand, from BOTH sides, is why there is a need to take shots at collectors who like different things than you.

To the low end collectors – I understand your points. $665 for five cards IS a ton of money, and I would never buy a box of Exquisite myself. That said, there are obviously a lot of people out there who make a lot of money who enjoy the product. What’s wrong with that? It has the same right to exist as any low end product. The bottom line is that as long as Upper Deck makes money on Exquisite, they’ll keep producing it. Same with their low end sets. For both high end and low end sets – if there were not enough collectors interested in them, they would not be produced.

I don’t understand why many low end collectors act as if their way of collecting is the ONLY true way of collecting. As if people who enjoy high end products somehow are less devoted to the hobby than they are. That’s simply not true. Guys who spend thousands of dollars per month on cases and boxes of high end products are really the ones who are keeping the hobby afloat. On the other hand, guys who only buy a couple of packs at Wal Mart every month are doing very little to keep the hobby (or maybe I should say the card companies) alive. I don’t think it’s right to assume that anyone who collects high end products is only in the hobby for the short term.

To the high end collectors – I understand your points too. But it’s important to show respect to the low end collectors. Gellman likes to say that low end collectors are living in the past, and I think that’s unfair. Sure, low end collectors’ habits are more in line with the way things were 20-30 years ago, but there is still a lot to keep low end collectors happy in TODAY’s hobby too. It’s safe to say that base Topps, Heritage, A&G, and similar products are not going away any time soon, and neither are set builders.

Some people like low end cards, some people like high end cards, and other people (like me) enjoy both. It’s great that we all have different collecting habits, and it’s great that there are so many great blogs, message boards, and YouTube videos devoted to showcasing the many different ways that people enjoy the hobby. I wish that everyone would embrace each other’s differences and not try to demean anyone who likes to collect different products than they do.

The card companies are only going to produce products that they can make a profit on, and they’re producing both high end and low end cards. That tells me that there’s a lot of interest in BOTH types of collecting. Neither is going to go away any time soon, and not only should we accept that, we should EMBRACE that fact. Because if all high end collectors disappeared or all low end collectors disappeared, the card companies would make much less money, and likely would not survive. If you think about it we’re all interdependent.

My last words – collect the cards that you like to collect, and accept that nobody else in the world is going to collect exactly the same thing as you – and that’s a good thing.

14 08 2009
CPAdave

Dave has made a very well-worded and appropriate comment. The last time I checked, this is a HOBBY. If things like this piss you off so badly that you have to complain about almost everything that comes out or everything that other people say, you should walk away, take up fishing (or any other activity that will better your life emotionally), and enjoy life.

For all of you who do still enjoy collecting and actually find happiness in pieces of cardboard with names/pictures/jerseys/autographs of your favorite teams and players, then please drink a beer, calm down, and let’s get back to discussing why this HOBBY is so great, and not listing everything that’s wrong with it…

14 08 2009
mfw13

Gellman,

I guess that you and I are going to have to disagree about both the definition of collecting and when people start collecting. While I’m sure that some people do enter the hobby as adults, I’m guessing that most of them are prospectors who and will leave the hobby as soon as they get bored with posting videos of their “mojo hits” on YouTube and will not around in 20/30 years, let alone five or ten. The people who are going to be keeping the hobby afloat in the long run are the lifelong collectors who started collecting as kids.

In my opinion, today’s overwhelming focus on relics/autos/low-numbered parallels is no more than a fad and therefore something that is not sustainable over the long term. Just like many of the products that were being hyped like mad during the 90’s are now virtually worthless, ten years from now, 99% of the autos/relics/low-numbered parallels being produced today will also be virtually worthless (heck, many of them are already worthless!).

14 08 2009
Charlie

Dude, what is so hard for you to understand? Did you read Dave’s post?
You are approaching this as if there are only 2 options.

1. People who collect sets
2. Speculators who “gamble” on high-end boxes.

I’ve tried explainig this before. Dave, Gellman, and I are neither of those.

I collect Andre Dawson and Billy Williams. Dave collects Evan Longoria. Adam collects Adrian Peterson and Joe Mauer. Mario collects Andrew Miller and Jose Canseco.

Player collectors are what drive the “gamblers” to bust those boxes and cases and sell the hits. And I would venture to guess that there are just as many, if not more, Player Collectors than Set Collectors.

This is the point we have all been trying to get across. Dave is just much more eloquent in going about it 😉

14 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

Yes

Good point Dave, and CPA. I respect your voices in the community. Although we may not agree on a lot of issues ( why should we?) We should respect each others views, and beliefs no matter how strange or different they may be. Its hard to be an expert when no two collections are the same.

However we have to stand up to the companies when they make mistakes as well. This goes hand in hand with helping out the fellow collector. If you don’t then they will have no idea that they exist, and keep making them. I like to think that the reason that Topps went to on card autographs for this years Chrome release was a direct result of an army of bloggers like ourselves who demanded they do so.

We all have the power to change the bad practices that companies make. After all without us they don’t exist. Thats why I like Marios blog, because he goes after them, and lets them know that us the collector have a voice.

Mojo

14 08 2009
nraposa

I think ultimately the point of this debate is the future of the Hobby and the high end products impact on the hobby. My opinion is that the high end stuff is not good as it devalues everything else produced and excludes people from gaining the chance the make the big hits.

14 08 2009
mfw13

Charlie,

Yes I did read Dave’s post, and I understand it perfectly. Notice that I have never criticized anybody for collecting whatever they choose…my points are more oriented towards the markets as a whole and the future of the hobby.

My main argument is a very simple one….if the manufacturers continue to focus more on high-end products while neglecting the low-end products that kids can afford, the hobby will eventually die due to a lack of new collectors. It’ll take twenty or thirty years, but it will happen eventually.

And contrary to what you and Gellman say, there current aren’t any true low end products for kids to buy. Even the lowest-end products (OPC, Topps base, UD base, Upper Deck X) cost roughly 20 cents per card and are therefore signficantly overpriced (as I noted upthread the inflation-adjusted cost for a base card should be about a nickel). Right now, there is high-end and middle-end, but pricewise there sure as heck isn’t any low end, and that is what is going to doom the hobby over the long run.

14 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

MFW

WalMart has cut the prices on some of their older retail boxes to 50% off. You can get a retail blaster for as low as $5.00 in some stores. I donate cards to the boys and girls at the United Way once a month, and understand where your coming from.

Mojo

14 08 2009
Dave

mfw13 – one of the interesting things about the hobby to me is how much it has evolved through the years. If we were talking 20-30 years ago, I don’t think we could have ever imagined many of the products that are on the market today. Similarly, we have no idea where the market will be 20-30 years from now. I am confident though, that the card companies will be producing products that their consumers want. If there’s a strong demand for cheap, low end cards, they’ll make a lot of those, and if there’s a strong demand for pricey, high end cards, then that’s what we’ll see.

Regarding your point about there not being any true low end products for kids to buy – I disagree. There may not be 99-cent packs, but there are definitely $1.99 packs readily available at every Wal Mart and Target. Without much effort, you can find older packs (junk wax) selling for less than $1 at a hobby shop or online. And honestly, I have witnessed in person and on YouTube, many kids enjoying packs and boxes of cards that are much more expensive than that, including high end cards. Do you really believe that if Topps or UD released a 99-cent per pack product in 2010 that kids would be jumping back into the card collecting hobby in droves? I really doubt that. And since the card companies would lose money on a product like that, they will not produce it.

14 08 2009
Charlie

mfw13 – these will be my last thoughts on this subject.

The kids arguement is getting tired. Topps Opening Day was $.99 per pack, and IMHO, exactly what you are lobbying for as a product. Base cards that kids could afford, with a few numbered inserts, and a very rare 1 or 2 per case autograph. Yet this product failed miserably. So did UD 1st Edition. Gone also is Topps Total.

In my opinion they failed because:

1. They are printed on cheap flimsy cardboard to keep the price low.
2. They are boooring as hell.
3. Kids are not stupid, and are not going to buy cheap crap. Do you think those Pokemon cards are cheap? Hell no they aren’t. My local shop owner actually makes a better profit on those than on anything else in the store! Most kids DO NOT want a flimsy cardboard base card of Rickie Weeks.

You can bet your ass that if those products were profitable for the manufacturers, they’d still be making them. Exquisite is not profitable because anyone HAS to buy it. It sells out every year because people WANT IT.

Please keep in mind that when Mario posts about great design and incredible looking inserts from the 90’s, those cards were not coming from 45 cent packs. Those packs were $4-10 BACK THEN!

You can collect whatever you want, and I’m not going to bash you for it. The bashing of high-end collectors is what has pissed me off about this entire thread. High-end products have been around for quite a while now, because COLLECTORS buy the single cards at shows and on eBay, period.

14 08 2009
mfw13

I think it depends on how you define kids. Kids under the age of ten couldn’t care less about a card’s future value. Once they get older than that and become more knowledgeable about money, future value does start to play into their decisions.

To me, the issue isn’t just price, it’s also distribution. As has been discussed on other threads, distribution is horrible these days…with shops, shows, Ebay, and big box retailers being the only place where cards are now sold. Here in Seattle, there are only two card stores still in business and maybe 8-10 shows a year (with only 20-25 tables), and since kids don’t generally use Ebay, that leaves big box retailers as pretty much the only places they can buy cards. I’ve always wondered why the manufacturers don’t make more of an effort to sell cards at ballparks (they are almost impossible to find at Safeco Field, for example), and why they have not tried to develop partnerships with school districts to distribute their cards (much like food & soda companies do) in the classroom.

As for why low-end products haven’t gained any traction, I’m guessing it’s because:

a) they were not marketed, so kids didn’t know about them
b) aforementioned lousy distribution
c) lost in the shuffle due to their being too many products being released

And by the way….I’m not against the high-end per se….I just don’t think that it can sustain the hobby over the long term.

14 08 2009
Hoiles

Getting back to the original point, there’s nothing wrong with high-end (I must admit I enjoy watching some of the breaks), but when you spend that much money on a box of cards you open yourself up to a fair amount of ribbing. That should not surprise anyone, it is not limited to sports cards.

14 08 2009
Ricky

–As has been discussed on other threads, distribution is horrible these days–

Besides the price of cards now, that’s gotta be the next biggest reason keeping kids outta the hobby.. When I was a kid, the very large majority of all the packs I got were bought at supermarkets, gas stations, and convenience stores.. I don’t see packs at these same types of stores anymore, where every kid will see them, and it definitely all comes down to the cost..

14 08 2009
Gellman

Ok, im done with this, my head asplode.

14 08 2009
mfw13

Or let me put it another way…right now the distribution of products is roughly 60% high-end, 40% middle-end, and 0% low-end (i.e. less than $1 per pack). There is not a single product out their that retails for less than a dollar a pack, and nobody can convince me that that is good for the hobby. A better distribution might be 40-40-20 or 30-40-30, for example.

So Charlie, Gellman, Beaverman, etc., it’s not that I think high-end is bad in and of itself….it’s that I think the EXTENT TO WHICH HIGH-END IS DOMINATING THE HOBBY which I think is bad.

You can only flood the market with so many relics and autos of inconsequential players before supply overwhelms demand. Sure their will always be demand for super-rare cards of the superstars, but 80-90% of the relics and autos being released today are of players who will be nobodies in five years.

What is the hobby going to do when the inevitable happens and demand (and prices) for autos & relics begins to wane? Are the gamblers who were in the hobby only to try and flip those cards for a profit going to continue to collect? A few of them may, but most will leave the hobby and move on to something else. And given the extent to which the hobby is ignoring kids today, who will be left to replace them? Yes, many of the people who collect the high-end stuff (such as yourselves) also collect other stuff and will stay in the hobby, but who is going to replace all those guys on YouTube yelling “mojo” every time they pull a card they can sell for a profit?

14 08 2009
ToddUncommon

I buy all the way up and down the spectrum, from retail packs at Target to UD Premier, Topps Finest, and until I knew better, the occasional Triple Suck. I do like opening new product, and having my wife or other family members help me open it. It helps to have the hobby uninitiated (or even skeptical) personally open a pack of something, and even they can tell if they pulled something fantastic or not.

I predominantly am a collector (rather than speculator / prospector, but have on occasion, i.e., Lincecum), with a mix of set building, player collecting, and curiosity fulfillment (hence, my enjoyment of oddball). The chase of possibly getting something crackalackin’ from a high end box has its place. I don’t deny that. I think the deeper issues rest elsewhere:

– Prospector / speculators often have a tendency to be hype machines, with at least a touch of arrogance. Being able to buy expensive products has never made anyone a better person. Buying cheaper products doesn’t do that either.

– Buying expensive new boxes of anything does not make a person a blinged-out hobby mogul, either. Make no mistake that the top hobby money, if that is what interests you, is in the truly old and genuinely scarce, in high quality. If money is indeed they yardstick, then buy something from Robert Edward instead of an eBay BIN sometime, and then a bragging attitude is backed up with fact. There’s a reason that Mr. Mint, potential jerk that he may be, buys nothing after 1980, and prior to 1970, the better. Getting a 10% discount at Blowout on Exquisite or Sterling, as cool as the cards may be, do not make you a hobby Warren Buffett.

– By the way, mojo magic and high-end product are not best friends that call each other every day. Buying high end and then exclaiming how magical you are when you get a good pull is like paying for a pricey call girl and then bragging about the “bonus” sex you got. Duh, you paid for it. I’ll believe mojo when I see a guy pull a red ink auto out of 10 in a product like Bowman or something similar where roughly 38 zemtillion packs exist. That’s real luck, magic fingers, or an Enchanted Vorpal Dildo of Shagging +5; whatever works I guess.

– Lastly, no, I don’t believe Upper Deck did not make a mistake with those Exquisite boxes in the video break. What they call 4 cards as “hits” with 1 base just has very, very low contemporary standards for what they consider a hit. A 1/1 printing plate that few people want? A hit! A boring gold parallel to 500? A hit! Sure, maybe five years ago. Just the fact that these box breakers are underwhelmed with these supposed hits is demonstrative of the raised expectations by which “hits” are considered in the hobby now. You’d think that the Exquisite base cards might become the new rarity in 10 years, as those are often ignored or cast aside like a used Trojan.

– Sure, people want (or may unrealistically expect) to pull the LeBron fingernail card or whatever the top pull would be, but even the most degenerate gamblers would like a reasonable chance to just make their money back. UD knows that the risk buyers are taking is now much, much greater that they will effectively lose money on a box, much less break even or get the whale hit. That doesn’t stop the card maker from dropping the price point to mitigate that risk for the consumer. UD is not alone in this, but since they do high-end “best” (i.e., “often”), they tend to be the most prolific perpetrators.

– Pro players, unions, and leagues also need to recognize that their old cash cow is skinny enough to show ribs, if not near death. They will need to readjust their money-making expectations, otherwise, nobody has to pay them to do, or autograph, anything. Once the costs of player-dependent assets could come down (unis, autos. equipment, etc.), hopefully we’ll start to see better quality, better designed products with more reasonable price points up and down the hobby purchasing scale.

14 08 2009
noah

Why didn’t you guys show the third box? I watched three case breaks and in all three there was one box in the case that had an awesome card. I saw one dual Jordan/Kobe auto, one triple logoman(Malone, Stockton, and Hornacek), and a Jordan nameplate auto patch to 15.

14 08 2009
Dave

mfw13 and Ricky – I definitely agree with you about distribution. It would be great to see packs of cards being sold in more places. I have seen them being sold at several major and minor league ballparks over the last few years. I just don’t see how the existence of high end products is keeping kids away from the hobby.

14 08 2009
kris

To the gent that said that high end stuff devalues low end stuff — it never works like that. Marginal stuff always sets the price for high-stuff. It’s just the way the world works, or markets, I guess — well, I don’t guess, I know but that’s not the point.

Unfortunately, I personally think the little bitches over at the big-three? are producing inferior products to showcase their premiere products.

It would cost them 10 cents a box to improve the hits to crazy-awesome looking, and they’d sell more boxes. However, they wouldn’t be able to sell more than a handful of 600 dollar boxes.

It sucks, but that’s just the way it is. They feel like that’s the best way to make money, and it probably is. Considering that Topps really has pretty crappy high-end stuff, I’d like to see them implement a strategy whereby junk wax costs a little bit more, but looks as good as UD high-end. Sure, there won’t be crazy 5 colored patches, but everything will just look unbelievable. They should try it in football or something.. who knows.

15 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

Todd
What happened to your blog?

A man with a world of knowledge, and expertise like yourself should get that thing back running.

Mojo ( no offense its just a nickname)

15 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

This is you right Todd?

25 Years of Card Collecting Experience…
…and not even 35 years old. I’ve collected cards before there was “a market”, and before Air Jordans existed. The inital boom in the mid-80’s, the crash of the late 80’s-early 90’s, chase cards, “premium” cards, and now graded cards and cards with postage-stamp swatches of “history”–I’ve watched it all since childhood, and I can’t wait for what’s next. Cards with DNA profiles of star athletes? Mario Lemieux’s blood is O-, now yours can be too!

16 08 2009
ToddUncommon

Thanks, Mojo.

Yep, that’s me. That’s been part of my “About Me” page on eBay for the better part of this decade. I meant that tongue-in-cheek then, and I generally mean it the same way now.

I definitely can’t wait to see what the next supar-gimmick wil be. They’ve already done 3D (both physical and virtual), and life-size, both flat and inflatable.

I’m holding out for implantable brain chips that makes you think you ARE Derek Jeter, or maybe Megan Fox. Or both, depending on which side of the plate someone hits (untapped market?).

I just liked the ridiculous idea of getting a blood transfusion to match that of a person’s favorite athlete, based off of some DNA sample on a card. Naturally, that superfan procedure would likely be fatal, but it would get the collector “closer to the game than evar!!!1!11!!”

We now have seen some cards with DNA potential, but not of a living athlete (yet). It would be hilarious if someday a trading card was used to collect genome information to prove an athlete’s paternity test.

As for now, we’d have to settle for Zombie Woolly Mammoth Lincoln hybrids generated from the hobby’s fossil and follicle record thus far.

As for the blog, I think I’ve finally run out of excuses. I’ve already used up getting married, on a honeymoon, and slammed by work. Not much left that packs that kind of punch. So, I guess I’ll just have to back up some thread posts with some real, actual, hobby *work*.

Actually, I dig the nickname. It can totally work too, if you have a rep for being a gravity well for sick pulls, and collecting the most phone numbers of the hottest Hooters waitresses. It has an edgy “Manos: the Hobby Hands of Fate” kind of ring to it.

16 08 2009
The Mojo Hand

I love it!!

Im telling you dude the collecting universe does not quite know what they are missing out on Todd. If I ever get that dream publication I would love to hire you as a writer.

Mojo

18 08 2009
jl

You do all relize that this hobby first started around kids. Gellmen you have the balls to say that this hobby thrives on used relics and autos. I collected for 26 yrs, I hate what this hobby has become. I left because of people who have become greedy, overbearing opinion giving jerks who have not been around since pulling a 1987 Bo Jackson. You what you autos and relics, that is what keeps you around, it should be the history. I hope that this hobby crumbles and has to market to kids again. Topps is historic, UD was at one point inovative, the companys did not do anything to stop this trend, of crap and high prices to please the high end collector. The economy has nothing to do with anything, it’s the greed of pulling something on get this a Fu*kin piece of cardboard. And if you are willing to pay 600.00 for a tiny swatch of clothing, and a auto you killing the economy.

29 09 2009
joeblow

To all you haters that think spending $1,00000000000s of dollars on sports cards is crazy or some what stupid, think again. We all do it? Regardless if its me spending on 20 cases of Exquisite or you spending $100. on random crap, we are all guilty of making the sports card companies rich. And what do we get for our pleasure, well some of us find satisfaction in pulling a $1,000-$20,000. dollar card, Its our money. If we wish to spend it on these high end cards then you should just sit back and enjoy buying them off of us on ebay. Dont be a hater just because you can not afford to break cases of this crap. Maybe we (ME) are really crazy, however with out people like us the card companies are done and your $100. product is no longer produced. So look at it as if us crazy deep pocket buyers are doing you a favor. Peace to all, quit the hate!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: